May132014

Favorites bad subtitles from The Fellowship of the Ring

(Source: peregrint, via shejustdoesntcare)

10AM
thefrogman:

Photo by Ajeet Vikram

thefrogman:

Photo by Ajeet Vikram

(Source: blackspartacus, via shejustdoesntcare)

10AM
barcarole:

Igor Stravinsky and Claude Debussy in the latter’s apartment in the Avenue du Bois de Boulogne, Paris; photo by Erik Satie, June 1910.

barcarole:

Igor Stravinsky and Claude Debussy in the latter’s apartment in the Avenue du Bois de Boulogne, Paris; photo by Erik Satie, June 1910.

(via gohomekiki)

10AM

thejazzblues:

THELONIOUS MONK - Straight No Chaser 1965

(via gohomekiki)

10AM

sci-universe:

In a period of personal difficulties, Rose-Lynn Fisher began to observe and photograph tears close under a microscope. She studied 100 different tears and found that basal tears (the ones that our body produces to lubricate our eyes) are drastically different from the emotional. Her project is called The Topography of Tears.

"One day I wondered if my tears of grief would look any different from my tears of happiness - and I set out to explore them up close. Years later, this series comprises a wide range of my own and others’ tears, from elation to onions, as well as sorrow, frustration, rejection, resolution, laughing, yawning, birth and rebirth, and many more, each a tiny history."

10AM
patrondebris:

Reading: Are You Doing it Wrong?

patrondebris:

Reading: Are You Doing it Wrong?

(Source: pmpevato, via gohomekiki)

10AM

portraitinjazz:

The Dizzy Gillespie Quintet live on BBC Jazz 625 (1966)

If you find any free time - just click play, relax and pretend you’re back in the 60s sitting in the BBC studio, watching Dizzy and co in their prime.

(via gohomekiki)

10AM
sci-universe:

Auroras seen from space – probably the coolest thing in the world. The spectacle is equivalent from land as well, though.
Timelapse provided by the International Space Station

sci-universe:

Auroras seen from space – probably the coolest thing in the world. The spectacle is equivalent from land as well, though.

Timelapse provided by the International Space Station

10AM

"Lost really has two disparate meanings. Losing things is about the familiar falling away, getting lost is about the unfamiliar appearing. There are objects and people that disappear from your sight or knowledge or possession; you lose a bracelet, a friend, the key. You still know where you are. Everything is familiar except that there is one item less, one missing element. Or you get lost, in which case the world has become larger than your knowledge of it. Either way, there is a loss of control.

Imagine yourself streaming though time shedding gloves, umbrellas, wrenches, books, friends, homes, names. This is what the view looks like if you take a rear-facing seat on the train. Looking forward you constantly acquire moments of arrival, moments of realization, moments of discovery. The wind blows your hair back and you are greeted by what you have never seen before.

The material falls away in onrushing experience. It peels off like skin from a molting snake. Of course to forget the past is to lose the sense of loss that is also memory of an absent richness and a set of clues to navigate the present by; the art is not one of forgetting but letting go. And when everything else is gone, you can be rich in loss.”

—Rebecca Solnit, from A Field Guide to Getting Lost (via beingblog)
October272013

sci-universe:

Les étoiles by Stéphane Vetter.

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